Oregon County Commissioners tour Lane County emergency and transitional housing sites. by Pat Farr

Friday, October 14th, 2016

 

Veterans Rest Stop operated by Community Supported Shelters offers safe, secure and clean transitional residences for homeless veterans

Veterans Safe Spot operated by Community Supported Shelters offers safe, secure and clean transitional residences for homeless veterans

On October 14, 2016 I will facilitate a tour of emergency, transitional and permanent housing facilities in Lane County for a group of Oregon county commissioners.  We will visit a variety of sites that are of interest to members of the Association of Oregon Counties who are hoping and expecting to develop and build a variety of types of housing in their home counties.

I am with Lincoln County Commissioner Bill Hall at Opportunity Village Eugene

I am with Lincoln County Commissioner Bill Hall at Opportunity Village Eugene

Following is the itinerary for the tour including links to the facilities we will visit and other facilities that provide a ladder of housing ranging from emergency shelters to permanent home-ownership opportunities:

County Commissioners facilities tour of Lane County veterans’ and other emergency and transitional housing facilities

October 14 2016

1:00 pm           Arrive at Opportunity Village 111 North Garfield, Eugene

Visit rest stop at Garfield and Roosevelt Avenues, on city of Eugene owned property, this rest stop has facilities for disabled homeless individuals.

Tour Opportunity Village Eugene, on city of Eugene owned property, on city of Eugene owned property, this facility has conestoga-dwellings, wooden huts, community food preparation, gathering and warming and sanitation.

http://www.opportunityvillageeugene.org/p/contact-us.html

2:25 pm           Travel to Veterans’ Safe Spot 1542 W 1st Avenue, Eugene, on Eugene Mission property.  Transitional housing for veterans.

http://communitysupportedshelters.org/eugene-safe-spots

Visit adjacent Nightingale Rest Stop:  transitional housing currently on Mission property, which has been historically located on Lane County property.  This facility elocates every six (or so) months

http://respectexistence.org/nightingale-health-sanctuary-full-description/

If time permits we will visit an emergency car camp on Lane County Property

The  tour was well attended, although accompanied by severe weather including thunder, lightning, hail, heavy wind and rain!  Thanks to Dan Bryant and Tod Scheider for guiding.

Dan Bryant explains to Oregon County Commissioners how the great hall at Opportunity Village serves the residents

Dan Bryant explains to Oregon County Commissioners how the great hall at Opportunity Village serves the residents

Other websites of interest regarding veterans’ housing, chronic homelessness and housing first efforts in Lane County:

Square One Villages, Emerald Village Eugene just broke ground on a tiny house project that will provide equity building opportunities for residents of the village:  http://www.squareonevillages.org/emerald

Operation 365 Veteran Homelessness website with links to partners in the project that housed 404 homeless veterans and their families in 2015:  https://www.eugene-or.gov/2942/Homeless-Veterans-Program

St. Vincent DePaul of Lane County Veterans’ Housing Project website, providing houses and apartments to veterans and their families:  https://www.svdp.us/what-we-do/affordable-housing/vet-lift/vet-housing-project-1/

Stellar Apartments includes 14 units for families of deployed National Guard soldiers and homeless veterans:  http://www.svdp.us/what-we-do/affordable-housing/rental-housing/completed-projects/stellar-apartments/

 

Pat Farr

 

 

 

 

 

United Way hosts nonprofits’ discussion with legislators. by Pat Farr

Monday, October 10th, 2016

On October 6 I moderated a discussion between Oregon State Legislators and the heads of 15 agencies funded by United Way of Lane County.

Noreen Dunnels, United Way of Lane County's Executive Director asked me to moderate a discussion between funded agency chiefs and state legislators on October 6 2016.

Noreen Dunnels, United Way of Lane County’s Executive Director asked me to moderate a discussion between funded agency chiefs and state legislators on October 6 2016.

More than 15 chiefs of Lane County’s largest nonprofit organizations, a total of thirty five participants, asked hard questions regarding how each of the legislators on the panel would support their priorities in the 2017 Oregon Legislative Session.

Questions for Oregon Legislators from the audience were direct and incisive.

Questions for Oregon Legislators from the audience were direct and incisive.

Included on the panel were veteran legislators Senator Lee Beyer (D-Springfield), Representative Phil Barnhart (D-Eugene and Brownsville), Senator Chris Edwards (D-Eugene), Representative John Lively (D-Springfield) and Representative Nancy Nathanson (D-Eugene).

Representative John Lively listens as Rep Nancy Nathanson fields a question on affordable housing.

Representative John Lively listens as Rep Nancy Nathanson fields a question on affordable housing.

Each legislator had an opportunity to introduce themselves and their priorities before  the start of questioning.  While each talked of ranges of issues, their main focus was on the business likely to come before the committees they chair (each of the representatives is standing for reelection in November).  Beyer chairs the Senate Transportation Committee; Barnhart is chair of House Revenue; Edwards chairs the Senate Committee on Environment and Natural Resources; Lively chairs the House Veterans and Emergency Preparedness Committee and Nathanson is co-chair of the Joint Ways and Means Committee.

Each legislator paid particular attention to issues likely to be worked in the committees they will chair if re-elected and Democrats maintain control of both bodies.

Each legislator paid particular attention to issues likely to be worked in the committees they will chair if re-elected and Democrats maintain control of both bodies.

Questions and comments largely centered on budgetary priorities and each legislator talked about the difficulty of funding all projects and agencies that they would like to fund.  Rep. Lively summed up the budgetary question with the response, “As our economy continues to slowly improve, we have much work to do to make the incremental changes we can with the resources we have.”

Beyer, Barnhart and Edwards team up on a response regarding the affordable housing crisis

Beyer, Barnhart and Edwards team up on a response regarding the affordable housing crisis

uway-edwards-barnnhart-100616

Noreen Dunnells, Amanda McCluskey, Erin  Fifield, Kara Smith, Beverlee Hughes and others engage the panel.

Noreen Dunnells, Amanda McCluskey, Erin Fifield, Kara Smith, Beverlee Hughes, Jacob Fox and others engage the panel.

uway-opperman-100616

The main focus of everyone’s attention was the lack of housing at all levels in Lane County.  The low vacancy of rentals combined with the high expense of building new residences have combined to cause more families and individuals to fall into either impossibly expensive housing or homelessness.

Beverlee Hughes, Executive Director of FOOD for Lane County succinctly stated, “Four years ago when we asked clients ‘What single thing would help you most?’ the response was overwhelmingly, ‘Affordable health care.’ Today the response is, .Jobs and affordable housing’.”

uway-audience-100616

Agencies represented (not all are UW funded agencies) in the room included, ARC of Lane County, Volunteers in Medicine, Planned Parenthood, Lane County Human Service Commission, Kids in Transition to School, Oregon Social Learning Center, Salvation Army, Lane Independent Living Association, Boy Scouts of America, Parenting Now, Looking Glass, Centro Latino Americano, Direction Services, Housing and Community Services Agency of Lane County, City of Springfield, Community Sharing of Cottage Grove, HIV Alliance, YMCA, FOOD for Lane County, Goodwill Industries, St. Vincent DePaul of Lane County, NEDCO.

 

Homelessness can be reduced–and Lane County has a plan to do it. by Pat Farr

Sunday, August 28th, 2016

 

The Poverty and Homelessness Board (PHB) provides advice to the Board of County Commissioners and the intergovernmental Human Services Commission with the goal of reducing and preventing poverty and homelessness in Lane County.

Operation 365 was part of the Poverty and Homelessness Board's strategy to reduce homelessness in Lane County.

Operation 365 was part of the Poverty and Homelessness Board’s strategy to reduce homelessness in Lane County.

It assists the development of the delivery of housing and services to meet the specific needs of people who are impoverished or homeless improving their stability. It assists to maximize the allocation of local, state and federal funds made available for this purpose. It serves as the administrative board for the Lane County Community Action Agency and as the oversight board for the Lane County Continuum of Care.

On Thursday August 25, 2016, PHB Chair Pat Walsh, PHB member Mayor Kitty Piercy,  PHB Staff Steve Manella and Pearl Wolfe joined me in a discussion with Register Guard Editorial Board Jack Wilson and Ilene Aleshire about the makeup and strategies of the PHB.  They published an article in Sunday August 28, 2016 Register-Guard:  “Intractable, but not impossible” which gives the reader good insights about the PHB strategic plan to reduce homelessness in Lane County.

See the entire PHB Strategic Plan here.

Eugene Homeless Code Enforcement Approval

Friday, April 15th, 2016

Do you approve or disapprove of the City of Eugene relaxing code enforcement on homeless camping?

For complete poll results, click here.

Strong Support for Eugene Homeless Shelter

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016

Do you support or oppose the City of Eugene opening a public shelter for the homeless?

For complete poll results, click here.

Eugene Homeless Camping Regulation Views Trend

Monday, January 4th, 2016

The Eugene homeless camping regulation trend can be seen here.

Providing more affordable housing will boost local economy, save lives (not necessarily in that order). by Pat Farr

Friday, November 20th, 2015

Portland Business Alliance, Portland’s Chamber of Commerce, is a strong group of mainly Portland-area members.

This program at PBA drew what may be the largest audience the group has attracted

This program at PBA drew what may be the largest audience the group has attracted

PBA is the Portland’s Chamber of Commerce (see link here) and its mission is clearly stated:

Advocating for commerce, building community and supporting regional prosperity.

When adding affordable housing to the most difficult people to house was the topic of their monthly breakfast at the Sentinel Hotel in downtown Portland they had to move from their normal meeting room into the grand ballroom of the hotel. Because (by my count) more than 800 men and women, before going to work that morning, wanted to hear more.

I joined Matt Roberts at the University of Oregon’s table along with Lane County Housing and Community Services Agency (HACSA) director Jacob Fox, Dave Hauser of Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce and Jim Jacks of Oregon Solutions to hear Lloyd Pendelton tell how Utah started and operated its “Housing First” program.

Utah’s program began by placing homeless people who were frequent users of hospital emergency rooms and the public safety system into stable housing. This included men and women who were suffering from alcohol and other drug addictions. And the results were immediate and significant.

The people who were suddenly housed suddenly quit causing police calls. Then, by being in a stable living environment they began healing. Kicking their addictions that often landed them in jail or the ER.

Just as suddenly the businesses located in the areas where the homeless men and women had been crashing experienced more business.

Men and women’s lives were being saved. Businesses were growing and thriving. People were feeling safer, both the ones who were newly housed and the families who wanted to go down town. Everybody was winning. (see more on Utah’s Housing First program here)

Later in the day I visited Bud Clark Commons, which is the location of a housing first model in Portland and also serves as an emergency shelter and day use center for homeless people.

Portland's Bud Clark Commons provides day use, emergency shelter and a housing first model

Portland’s Bud Clark Commons provides day use, emergency shelter and a housing first model

Utah’s model has elements that may not be replicable in Lane County, as does Bud Clark Commons. But some of the elements of both can serve Lane County as ways to save lives, make our community safer and boost the local economy.

Lane County, working with State Government and its cities including Eugene, Springfield, Cottage Grove etc. can employ a pilot project, possibly with as few as 12-20 living units, to demonstrate the effectiveness of providing housing to the men and women who have historically been the most difficult to help. Men and women whose lives can be saved.

Eugene’s Relaxed Homeless Code Enforcement Not Supported

Monday, October 26th, 2015

Do you approve or disapprove of the City of Eugene relaxing code enforcement on homeless camping?

For complete poll results, click here.

Tiny gifts for a giant vision of tiny homes. by Pat Farr

Saturday, October 3rd, 2015

Giving gifts to donors to nonprofit organizations is an often-used method to attract attention, but more significantly give the donors a lasting memory of their contribution to the cause. I offered a tiny gift of a hand-turned pen to donors to Square One Villages’ efforts to fill a gap in the housing ladder that allows homeless people to climb out of homelessness and into possible home ownership (go here).

Samples of pens that were given to donors of $250 or more at Square One Villages fundraiser for Emerald Village Eugene.  More than 50 donors gave over $100,000

Samples of pens that were given to donors of $250 or more at Square One Villages fundraiser for Emerald Village Eugene. More than 50 donors gave over $100,000

Homeless people will have a chance to not only live in a home but build equity. Dan Bryant’s vision of housing homeless people and allowing them to build equity is moving very close to reality. On Sunday September 20 a fundraiser was held at Sweet Cheeks Winery to tell people how building “tiny homes” can give men and women a step up in life that has never been offered before. A chance to live in a very dignified home in a very dignified development and, while paying rent, build equity that can be transferred to down payments for other types of housing.

After seeing samples of the quality of the housing and the remarkable return on investment, both in terms of houses built and opportunities where none existed before, more than 50 donors gave a total of more than $100,000 in cash to help fund the Emerald Village Eugene (EVE) housing project.

Tom Bowerman started the evening with a generous donation which shone a light on the path for other donors to follow.

This example of a tiny home shows that they can look dignified and fit into any neighborhood...

This example of a tiny home shows that they can look dignified and fit into any neighborhood…

Over a dozen architects have provided innovative plans to ensure that Emerald Village will be a welcome addition to Eugene’s housing mix. I believe this pilot program will fuel the drive for other such projects not only here in Lane County but throughout the country.

Eugene’s Homeless Camping Policy Support Evenly Split

Monday, September 7th, 2015

Do you approve or disapprove of the City of Eugene relaxing code enforcement on homeless camping?

For complete poll results, click here.